MUCHAGARA AA, Kenya FILTER juicy, blackberry, redcurrant, golden syrup

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MUCHAGARA AA, Kenya FILTER juicy, blackberry, redcurrant, golden syrup

from 11.00

Producer: Small-holder farmers

Washing station: Muchagara, owned by the Baragwi Cooperative

Region: Kirinyaga District
Altitude: 1800 masl

Varietal: SL28 & 34
Process: Fully washed, soaked, dried on raised beds

Importer: Falcon Speciality

Cup profile: Juicy & complex, blackberry, redcurrant, golden syrup

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Muchagara washing station is part of the Baragwi Cooperative Society and is located near the town of Muchagara in the Kirinyaga District. Founded in 1959, Muchagara is one of the oldest washing stations in Kenya and now has over 1000 members who deliver cherry to the wet mill, and most have between 200 and 500 trees. 

Cherry that is brought to the Muchagara wet mill is pulped and fermented the same day. After 36 to 48 hours of fermentation the coffee is washed moved to soaking tanks and soaked in clean water. Once the coffee has been soaked it’s moved to the drying beds where it dries for between 10 and 15 days. 

The vast majority of the coffee bought and sold in Kenya is traded through the national auction system, where marketing agents enter cooperatives’ and estates’ coffee and traders come to bid. The main buyers from this auction system are large multinationals, who then offer the lots to importers and roasters. This system has its challenges and buyers often encounter lack of transparency as well as price volatility. 

This year our importing partner Falcon Speciality has decided to start buying directly from the auction using a local Kenyan company who bid on their behalf after coffee samples have been pre-selected. As Falcon explain: “This was a conscious decision to support local Kenyan businesses as well as to make the supply chain more efficient. This is intended to be the first part of a plan to work on the transparency limitations in Kenya and ultimately the goal is to avoid using the auction system at all, by working directly with farmers’ associations, cooperatives and small estates, and not through a marketing agent.” 

This particular lot stood out on the cupping table for us for it’s juicy acidity, full rounded body and tons of summer fruit notes. We’re excited to be opening the Kenyan season with this stellar coffee.