LOS NISPEROS, Guatemala ESPRESSO creamy & sweet, vanilla fudge, ripe yellow plum

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LOS NISPEROS, Guatemala ESPRESSO creamy & sweet, vanilla fudge, ripe yellow plum

from 7.50

Producer: Sotero Cano

Municipality: San Antonio Huista
Region: Huehuetenango
Altitude: 1550 - 1600 masl

Varietal: Caturra, Bourbon & Pache
Process: Pulped, soaked, fully washed and dried on patios

Cup profile: Creamy & sweet, vanilla fudge, ripe yellow plum

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Finca Los Nisperos is located near the town of San Antonio Huista in Guatemala’s renowned coffee growing region Huehuetenango. From the Nahautl Aztec language Huehuetnenago translates to ‘land of the ancients’. Bordered on the north and west by Mexico, the department spreads over almost the entire length of the Sierra de Cuchumatanes mountain range. 

Los Nisperos farm lies at the high altitude of up to 1600 masl and spreads over 8 hectares of land with total average yearly production of 4800 kg of coffee. Benefiting from a particular microclimate with dry hot winds blowing from the Tehuantepec plain in Mexico, the land is protected from frost even at high altitudes which are perfect for production of great quality coffees. 

The farm is named after the Nispero fruit tree which grows in the area and can be seen used as a shade tree amongst the farms’ coffee trees. Other shade trees include Gravilleas as well as banana trees which also provide an extra cash crop for the growers.

The land is planted with Caturra, Bourbon and Pache varietals, all known for excellent cup quality. As many other small producers in the area, Sotero’s farming methods are organic by nature even though there isn’t an certification in place. As Sotero explains, the pulp left from processing is used as mulch and fertilizer around coffee trees, and banana leaves provide a source of potassium for the soil.

This lot has been processed by the traditional washed method where cherries are pulped after picking and left to ferment in a small fermentation tank where mucilage breaks down. This can take up to 3 days due to particularly cold weather in the area this harvest season. Once finished fermenting, the coffee is soaked in fresh water for 24h to stabilize moisture content before being dried on lined patios.